Monthly Archives: January 2017

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is not a migrant and although it is a bushveld bird commonly found on Sibuya Game Reserve, it is resident in leafy suburbs of South African towns and eastern coastal regions.

As with other kingfishers, pairs stick together and may hold the same territory for several years.
It has a broad and varied diet, eating a wide variety of insects, but rarely eating fish.

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is known in Afrikaans as Bruinkopvisvanger.

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher has a height of 24 cms and weighs around 60 gms. The head is coloured brown while the bill is coloured red. The Halcyon albiventris has a white coloured throat, orange legs and a black coloured back. The eyes are brown.

The male Halcyon albiventris has physical features that are slightly different from the female bird.

Photo taken by Ranger Scott

Photo taken by Ranger Scott

Feeding Habits

This bird forages for food on the ground and feeds on the tree trunk.  This birds forages for fish and other aquatic dwellers through surface sizing and diving for food in the water.  This bird has a specially adapted bill which helps it hunt for fish, crabs, shrimp and other aquatic animals in the water.

This bird eats insects such as butterflies, bees, wasps, locusts and ants. These invertebrates are usually hawked aerially, killed and then eaten.

Breeding, Habitat and Nesting Habits

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is a monogamous bird which means that the bird finds and breeds with one partner for the rest of its life. The bird lays between 2 to 5 eggs and they are coloured white.

The bird builts its nest in a hole in the ground.

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is mainly found in light and densely wooded forests, where there are Mopane trees.

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is found in the Southern African wetlands, riverine forests and moist grasslands.

The bird is at home in riverine forests and close to water bodies such as lakes, dams and streams.

Seen in Flocks, Singles or Pairs Normally

The Brown-hooded Kingfisher is mainly seen singly or in pairs in the wild.

It is also seen in flocks.

Advertisements

Lion Sleeping Habits

These kings of the jungle get quite a bit of shut-eye!

It turns out that “I’m a lion, hear me roar!” should probably be changed to “I’m a lion, hear me snore!” The king of the jungle racks up enough sleep to make the average house cat look extremely active by comparison. Take a look at just how much time the big cats spend snoozing.

Photo taken on safari in Sibuya Game Reserve

Photo taken on safari in Sibuya Game Reserve

How Many Hours Do Most Lions Spend Sleeping?

Male lions spend 18 to 20 hours a day snoozing, while females get 15 to 18 hours of shuteye. The lionesses spend more time hunting and taking care of cubs, which is why they get slightly less sleep. And following a large meal, lions may even sleep up to 24 hours—talk about a catnap!

What Time of Day Do They Sleep?

Lions tend to be nocturnal, doing most of their hunting after dusk when it’s cooler, so most of their sleep is accumulated during the day.

Where Do Lions Sleep?

To escape the hot sun, lions tend to find sleeping spots under the shade of bushes.